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Thoughts From The Field

Blog posts by the
GrowingDeer.tv team

How To Capture Bucks On Film

We’ve got antlers on the brain! It’s just the start of the summer and we are starting to see a few hit list bucks show up. It’s important for us to keep track of the growth progress as well as the health of the deer herd. To do so, we must place our trail cameras in the appropriate places. If your hunting ground is in timber country like ours, it’s important to place cameras on the limited resource in the area. We place our Reconyx cameras near the source of high quality vegetation. This typically means along the edges of a food plot. We also set out Trophy Rock Four65 to provide mineral to the deer herd. Both bucks and does will use these mineral sites heavily during the summer months. This combination usually results in some awesome videos of velvet bucks; you can even begin to develop your hit list for this fall!

Enjoying Creation,

Matt

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Better Fruit Trees, Better Hunting

We all know the attractiveness of fruit trees for wildlife, but it becomes even more clear when they’re spending the night standing in the yard just to eat fruit! Earlier this week I placed a Reconyx camera next to a couple peach trees I suspected deer to be using. These two trees are bearing a lot of fruit and are a great reminder of the advantages to having tree plots!

  • Deer love high quality fruit from a tree plot!
  • Pruning is very important in improving the quality and life of a fruit tree.
  • Tree plots can create a hunting hot spot.
  • Selecting the appropriate species, finding the right location and maintaining the trees are all factors in great tree plots!

For love of the land and Glory to God,

Adam

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How To Create Cover For Wildlife

Last week we discussed how the use of prescribed fire in the timber can increase the amount of native vegetation available to the wildlife. This week we dive deeper into what prescribed fire can offer. We use this tool to increase both poult and fawn survival rates. Native vegetation provides a canopy of cover that poults easily walk underneath. This shelters poults from the many predators from above. Removing the duff layer exposes small insects, bugs, and grubs. This allows poults to feed and move safely in these areas. Deer live their lives between ground level and the three foot mark. The vegetation in the burn unit is already several feet tall, making these areas much more attractive to fawns and mature deer. What was an area of limited productivity is now converted into habitat that will benefit many forms of wildlife in multiple ways.

GrowingDeer together,

Matt

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Creating Native Food Plots

When the conditions allow for a prescribed fire, we burn! During the late winter, we use prescribed fire in our timber areas. These fires burn slow and remove the duff layer on the forest floor. Throughout the spring, the sunlight hits the ground floor and germination of native early successional vegetation begins. This vegetation is ideal, full of nutrition and diversity. Prescribed fire during the right time of the year creates a native food plot in our timber! To get the most out of your land requires maximizing every acre!

GrowingDeer together,

Matt

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