AdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisement

Thoughts From The Field

Blog posts by the
GrowingDeer.tv team

Better Soil Equals Healthier Deer

First things first, we must understand that it all starts at ground level. Healthy soil contains essential nutrients and minerals. These elements are taken up by plants through their root systems. Plants transfer those nutrients and minerals to deer that consume them. Our Eagle Seed soybeans are transfer agents for those elements contained in the soil. Poor soil will limit the amount of genetic potential a deer can express. This is why we take soil samples each season to continue improving our soil, ultimately growing larger antlers and healthier deer.

GrowingDeer together,

Matt

Link directly to this post



Prime Time For Archery!

Get your summer time archery practice sessions started right! The last thing you want to do is form bad habits. I recommend practicing from a distance you feel very comfortable with. Starting off here will allow you to focus on your pre shot routine, step by step. This type of focus minimizes the chance of bad habits forming. As you continue with this method of practice, you will build muscle memory. Both your brain and your muscle need to go through the motions time and time again to ensure lethal shots are executed during bow season. Starting off early and correctly will train you to become a more successful bow hunter. Remember “Perfect practice makes perfect!”

GrowingDeer together,

Matt

Link directly to this post



Watching Antlers: Preparing For Bow Season

It’s that time of the year when we are changing gears. Missouri’s turkey season just closed. We are not only getting more sleep at night, but also dreaming of whitetails. Our Reconyx cameras have been capturing photos of great antler development here at The Proving Grounds. This is very exciting! We will enjoy watching bucks develop within the next couple months.

A young buck showing great antler development

This buck is off to a great start. You can bet we will keep our eye on him this summer!

This is an important time of the year. We take a few additional measures now to better prepare ourselves for hunting season. At this time of the year we move our Reconyx cameras from turkey strut zones to food plots and established Trophy Rock mineral sites. The recently planted Eagle Seed beans will soon attract deer. Positioning cameras on these plots allows us to watch feeding patterns during the summer. Learning these patterns early on can assist as opening day arrives. States with early bow openers like Kentucky, Maryland, or Wyoming have an advantage if summer feeding patterns are identified as season opens.

Mineral sites serve multiple purposes for us. Both bucks and does regularly use mineral locations throughout the summer. These locations are ideal for Reconyx cameras as well. Trophy Rock provides macro and micro trace elements to the local deer herd. As bucks develop their antlers this supply of minerals increases antler growth. This is a stressful time for does as they are dropping fawns and lactating over the next several months. Lactating requires a healthy diet plus additional nutrients to supply to young fawns. Trophy Rock can supply those necessary elements.

Placing cameras over food plots and Trophy Rock locations is a great way to build anticipation. Antler development is occurring while fawns are beginning to drop. Our cameras are in place to capture this all! We are excited to start cataloging bucks! It is a great time of the year for a deer manager.

GrowingDeer together,

Matt

Link directly to this post



Strategic Food Plot Management

Bucks feed at soybean food plot in woods

Soybeans are easy to grow about anywhere and provide great nutrition for deer.

This week has been an important week for us here at GrowingDeer. It’s not only the last week of turkey season, but the Eagle Seed soybeans are going in the dirt! Planting season is here. With that comes an appreciation of the hard work put in months ago.

Last August we planted many of our food plots in the Broadside blend. This is a fall mixture of soybeans, wheat, turnips, and radishes. This variety helped feed the wildlife throughout the winter. The Broadside has now been terminated in preparation for the new soybeans. Even though the Broadside is no longer living that doesn’t mean it does not serve a purpose.

As we are drilling the new soybeans into the Broadside blend it is laying down on top of the soil. This is all part of the plan! With the vegetation covering the soil, critical soil moisture is conserved. The long range forecast of rain is nearly impossible to predict. Rain could be a few days or weeks away. It’s important to take steps to conserve soil moisture. In addition, the vegetation is shading the ground. This helps to fend off weed growth or competition with the newly planted soybeans. Since the Broadside blend has been terminated it will slowly begin to breakdown. As it does this, nutrients will leach back into the soil. When this happens those nutrients are readily available for the new soybeans to uptake and benefit from.

Soybeans are drilled into the existing food plot

Simply planting a fall blend in your food plots and following this strategy can increase productivity in your next crop. The better the soil the better food plots will grow. When food plots are more productive the quality of the local deer herd will increase. Deer management should start at “ground level”.

Managing deer together,

Matt

Link directly to this post