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Blue Tongue Disease in Deer: How is it Affecting Populations?

EHD, also known as epizoodic hemorrhagic disease or blue tongue, swept across the whitetail range like a plague during the summer and fall of 2012, killing untold numbers of whitetails. Briefly, EHD is a virus that is transmitted from deer to deer by small biting flies known as midges. EHD spreads more quickly during bad droughts—such as that experienced across much of the nation last summer—because deer come to water more often as they don’t get much moisture from the vegetation they consume. The exposed mud around the water sources is the breeding grounds for the midges. So, when deer come to a get a drink, they are at very high risk for being bitten by the bugs and “injected” with the virus. Read More at BowHuntingMag.com